Talk:Maghreb

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This is in conflict with Western Sahara, which, I think, was written before. --Chlewey 14:43, 16 Feb 2005 (PST)

The problem is, I think I remember talking to you about the map you'd made of Southern Europe for the Factbook and you said that it was an artifact and didn't exist (Western Sahara), and that's why I went ahead with the idea of a unified Morocco. Is that not the case then? BoArthur 00:00, 17 Feb 2005 (PST)

I think from the sentence: "The Maghreb today was formed out of the former French Morocco, Castillean Morocco and the former French colony of Mauritanie.", we can safely remove the phrase Castillean Morocco. That should keep us out of trouble with Western Sahara, Rio de Oro, Castilian West Africa or whatever it is called. IJzeren Jan 01:50, 12 Mar 2005 (PST)

Sounds like a plan, Jan. :) BoArthur

Three questions. What is the lineage of the Caliph? Does any gvernment outside the Maghreb recognize him? What sect and legal school of Islam do the Caliph and his followers belong to? If the Caliph is the same branch of Sanussiya as the Libyans of the Fezzan, the Fezzan would be in rebellion.Theophilus88 09:59, 14 October 2005 (PDT)

Adding Aragon

So way back in the day, there creators were vague on Aragonese North Africa. They initially controlled a swathe of land roughly the size of real life Spanish Morocco only in Algeria, somewhere between what they control (Melilla and Oran), and I think including Tlemcen off the top of my head. That doesn't really change QSS or QAA, but could we maybe add something about Aragon's previous reign in this part of the world being much bigger and Aragon losing that land during the decolonization period but standing their ground and keeping those two cities? Oran was a huge and important city during the French period, nothing like tiny Ceuta and Melilla: I feel like we could easily explain that away as Oran coming to have a firmly-entrenched majority of Europeans that came earlier than other Europeans in real life and before the explosion of the Arab birth rate out there in the 20th Century: real life Oran might've even had a plurality of Europeans versus other groups I think off the top of my head. Misterxeight 17:00, 2 January 2018 (PST)

I just assumed that the French had taken the part of *here*'s Spanish Morocco around Melilla. I don't have any problem with the Aragonese having their own Aragonese Morocco though. I guess that we could explain them having a lot of land around Oran but just tiny Melilla in the area of the Maghreb Kingdom by stating that they ceded the parts of their protectorate around Melilla back to the Maghreb during the decolonisation process. Since the land around Oran was surrounded by France, which didn't really mind Aragon keeping that land around Oran on account of being a fellow European bunch of crusader infidels colonial power, they got to keep more territory in *here*'s Algeria than the territory they kept in Morocco/the Maghreb.
Tlemcen is established as being part of French Algérie on the Algeria page (well, in the map anyway. Granted, that map also calls Oran "Ceuta", so maybe I should take it with a grain of salt.). For the moment, I've just been operating under the assumption that it's part of French territory. Juanmartinvelezlinares 06:50, 9 January 2018 (PST)

Religion in the Maghreb

Mr. Miles and I, in our talks on Libya, were musing what if Morocco/the Maghreb was Sufri Kharijite Muslim. Morocco had a lot of weird movements in real life (the Fatimids got their Shiism from a real life revolt in inland Morocco in the 800's, whatever this religion is [1], etc), and we figured that Kharijitism sticking and developing in the Morocco area and spreading is just unique and also explains why there was a caliphate declared here and why they wouldn't recognize the still reigning sultan-caliph in Gordion, Turkey. There are Ibadi minorities (another school within Kharijitism), so that kind of fits, too. How would we go about getting that approved by the group? Misterxeight 17:10, 2 January 2018 (PST)

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