Talk:Hellenic Languages

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keep This could be expanded because of Nea Illenicia by Rio de la Plata and Greek. Pending review, o'course. BoArthur 13:58, 1 November 2005 (PST)

delete If someone wishes to create an article on those languages, then they can simply recreate the page. But, until then, this page is unnecessary Nik 20:22, 2 November 2005 (PST)

delete Agree with Nik. Of course, it could be expanded, but is anybody ever going to do that? And even if someone would start describing Greek or Costanici, that still doesn't warrant an article about the "Hellenic Languages". Besides, we still have the page IB Languages --IJzeren Jan 00:24, 3 November 2005 (PST)

Keep I just made it. Constanice is not the same as pure Greek, but then again neither is Yevanic. Misterxeight 00:15, 22 June 2008 (UTC)

Why is this a proposal? Misterxeight 22:25, 15 July 2008 (UTC)

See this. —IJzeren Jan Uszkiełtu? 23:08, 15 July 2008 (UTC)

Yeah but it's been in IB ever since Greece, it just hasn't been expanded on. Misterxeight 23:15, 15 July 2008 (UTC)

True that, I'm not saying at all the article shouldn't be there. The reason it was deleted three years ago was that it didn't contain any info. Obviously, that's different now. But before we take all this for granted, it should be debated first. —IJzeren Jan Uszkiełtu? 01:41, 16 July 2008 (UTC)
The article looks fine to me. Honestly, there's not a whole lot to add to it, cos it's going to be the same information as *here*. I suppose links to external articles on historical Greek languages would not be out of order. I don't know how much is known about Nea Illenicia's language Costanice. I think there's a web site or article somewhere. That should be linked to. Elemtilas 21:30, 20 July 2008 (UTC)

Contents

Yevanic

Since the Holocaust never happened an all Yevanic would still be a big language in Greece. For the life of me I can't find anything on it except the brief intro Wikipedia has on it. Some sites say they use their own version of the Hebrew alphabet, some say they just use the Hebrew alphabet. I can't find any words in Yevanic to compare it to Greek. Does anyone know any good language websites, possibly centering on extinct languages? Misterxeight 15:38, 27 July 2008 (UTC)

Greek vs. Latin

One would get disagreement from linguists by stating that Greek is the base of Latin. Latin was introduced to the Italian peninsula about 1000 B.C. by immigrants from northern Europe. The two languages are not related, other than both being included in the Proto-Indo-European language family. Of course, there were some vocabulary borrowings as often happens when a language spreads. Caeruleancentaur 16:19, 9 March 2009 (UTC)

That paragraph is about alphabets, and I think that's what it means. It's not very clear. Benkarnell 16:20, 9 March 2009 (UTC)

I forgot the word alphabet Misterxeight 01:36, 10 March 2009 (UTC)

Romanization

Though I've expressed I'd like Greek to be identical in this world, (even if it has French, Italian and... Turkish cognates) I hate our world's romanization of Greek. Would I be able to make a change of our world's romanization of Greek?

You probably might want an example.

The island of Euboea, my family's home town. Whoever translated it into English did the lazy form. It's pronounced Evv-ia (Evv-ya), not Eu-bo-ea. Cyrenaica. It's Key-rain-ee-key in Greek, not Sigh-rain-ih-ka. Plus the Greek letter Χ/χ is romanized to "chi", but it's a hissing "h" sound in actual Greek. Misterxeight

Hey, why not. Alternate romanizations are like conlangs for lazy folk like you and me, and an alternate scheme for Greek would fit right in.
Did the scheme *here* come out of Classical studies? If so, it would be a hard sell to change it. Maybe a new one was promulgated when Greece first became independent. Benkarnell 19:53, 15 March 2009 (UTC)

lol. I'm not sure where the Greek Romanization come from, only that according to Wikipedia Britain and America use different ones. Misterxeight 15:00, 16 March 2009 (UTC)

Athonite

How is Athonite considered a Greek dialect? I'd say its on its way to becoming a Greco-Turkish hybrid, but that's just me. Misterxeight 03:09, 21 April 2009 (UTC)

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