Central Asian Calendar

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The calendar currently in use in Turkestan and Uyguristan is a blending of three systems. It is mostly a Western-type Gregorian calendar, but it also contains elements of the Persian and Chinese calendar systems.

The names of the months are Persian in origin:

Navruz March
Çavır April
Mamor May
Mizäm June
Şildü July
Tamuz August
Kärgüyük September
Hazan October
Qarıça November
Jaltuqsan December
Qaņjar January
Aqpan February

However, the numbering of days within the months follows the standard Gregorian pattern, and the new year begins on the first of March, not the equinox as was traditional in the Persian calendar. The New Year holiday remains on the 21st/22nd, however.)

Numbering of years also follows the Gregorian calendar brought by the Russians, but there is a two month lag between the Western and Central Asian calendars due to the differing start dates.

Fountain in Almaliq depicting the amimal cycle

In addition, there is a Chinese-derived animal cycle system of naming the years which runs in parallel with the Gregorian year numbers. There are some differences from the usual Chinese system, replacing some of the animals with more Central Asian ones:

English name Turkestani name Years Chinese calendar equivalent
Rat Çiçqan 1936, 1948, 1960, 1972, 1984, 1996, 2008 -
Ox Buqa 1937, 1949, 1961, 1973, 1985, 1997, 2009 -
Snow Leopard Bars 1938, 1950, 1962, 1974, 1986, 1998, 2010 Tiger
Rabbit Qoyan 1939, 1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999, 2011 -
Snail Ulu 1940, 1952, 1964, 1976, 1988, 2000, 2012 Dragon
Snake Yılan 1941, 1953, 1965, 1977, 1989, 2001, 2013 -
Horse At 1942, 1954, 1966, 1978, 1990, 2002, 2014 -
Sheep Qoı 1943, 1955, 1967, 1979, 1991, 2003, 2015 -
Camel Tüyü 1944, 1956, 1968, 1980, 1992, 2004, 2016 Monkey
Cock/Rooster Ätiş 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, 2017 -
Dog It 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006, 2018 -
Pig/Boar Qaban 1947, 1959, 1971, 1983, 1995, 2007, 2019 -
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